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TECHNICAL INFORMATION 

on the 

SOLOVOX 

Model L 

(Tone Cabinet No. 92000 and above) 



OR those owners who are interested in 
knowing exactly how theSolovox works, and 
for the use of any capable radio technician 
who may be called upon to repair the Solo- 
vox, should it ever need such service. We 
suggest that this booklet be kept inside the 
piano bench. 



HAMMOND I N S T liiSNT. 'COMPA N Y 

42ii WestDiversey Avenue- ■ - ■ ■• - •■ • • ■.• ■ : ■• -.Chicago 39, Illinois 



MODEL L SOLOVOX 

This booklet describes the Model L Solovox, which was introduced in 1948. 
This model differs from the Model K primarily in three respects. (1) An elec- 
tronic vibrato replaces the former mechanical type, giving quieter and more 
reliable operation. (2) An improved mute circuit produces both string and 
clarinet-like tones of constant volume over the entire range of the keyboard. This 
constancy of volume is appreciated by the player as it reduces the number of 
knee-swell movements. (3) A completely new tuning system enables the musi- 
cian to play more rapidly because it instantly selects the highest note played. 
The new tuning circuit also eliminates switching of frequency dividers as the 
musician plays over the keyboard, resulting in a perfect tone quality match for 
all keys. 

Model J and K technical information is available from Solovox dealers or 
direct from the factory. 

HOW THE SOLOVOX WORKS 

All notes of the Solovox are controlled by a double triode vacuum tube mas- 
ter oscillator operating, at the audio frequencies of the three highest octaves of 
the instrument (523 to 3951 cycles per second). Thus the master oscillator oper- 
ates over the full keyboard range of three octaves. Each time a key is depressed, 
a contact under it tunes the oscillator to the pitch associated with the correspond- 
ing key in this three octave range. 

The output of the oscillator is fed into a series of three cascaded frequency 
dividers, each of which divides its input frequency by two and thus produces a 
note an octave lower than its input frequency. The three dividers thereby pro- 
vide pitches of one, two, and three octaves below the pitch of the oscillator. In 
this way, when the oscillator is tuned to some given note, each divider produces 
a note in exact octave relation to the oscillator, thus forming a series of four notes 
having exact octave relationships. The particular frequency divider or dividers 
selected for sounding through the amplifier and speaker will depend upon which 
of the BASS, TENOR, CONTRALTO, AND SOPRANO controls are used. 

A control contact under each key serves to transmit the signal to the speaker 
with a controlled rate of attack so as not to be musically abrupt. Tuned electrical 
circuits associated with the amplifier make it possible to alter the quality of tone. 

over' a wide range.' 

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WIRING DIAGRAMS 

In studying the operation of the Solovox, refer first to the block diagram 
(Figure 4), and second to the more detailed schematic circuit (Figure 1A) which 
is on the separate inserted sheet. Note that the arrangement of elements is exactly 
the same in these two drawings. 

The Oscillator 

The 36 coils which tune the audio frequency oscillator to the highest three 
octaves, shown in Figure 1 A, are located in the tuner box at the rear of the Solovox 
keyboard. When the lowest "C" key is played (this key has no tuning contact) , all 
36 coils are connected in series to form the tuning inductance of the oscillator. 
When any other key is depressed, the tuning contact under it shorts out some of 
these coils (making less total inductance) and thus tunes the oscillator up to the 
pitch associated with that key. If two keys are depressed at the same time the 
higher pitched of the two will sound. 

Frequency Dividers 

Each divider includes three triodes. One acts as a driver and pulse rectifier, 
supplying sharp and narrow negative pulses to actuate a symmetrical feed-back 
tripping circuit comprising two triodes in one 6SN7 tube. Either one (but only 
one) of these two triodes can be conducting at a time, for by drawing plate cur- 
rent it holds the other in a cut off condition. 

Suppose, for example, that the first triode is conducting and the second is 
cut off. Now a negative input pulse impressed on the grids of both triodes will 
not affect the second one, which is already cut off, but will cut off the first. This 
produces a positive pulse at the plate of the first triode, which is applied to the 
grid of the second triode through its feed-back connection. The second triode 
then suddenly conducts current, producing a negative pulse at its plate. This 
negative pulse, applied to the first triode grid through its feed-back connection, 



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The next input pulse will act on the second triode, cutting it off again and 
making the. first. conductive; and thus two input cycles are required to produce 
one output cycle. Each frequency divider circuit therefore divides its input fre- 

Page 5 



quency in half, producing an output signal one octave lower than the preceding 
divider. The triode plates of each divider stage furnish an output signal of rect- 
angular wave shape as well as the signal to drive the next divider stage. 

This divider circuit is capable of operating satisfactorily with wide variations 
in voltage, input frequency, and values of components, and therefore is remark- 
ably stable and requires no adjustments. 

Register Controls 

From the preceding, we see that whenever any one of the three G# keys, for 
instance, is depressed, the frequency dividers, together with the oscillator, pro- 
vide a series of four G# notes in exact octave relations. The particular divider 
whose output is to sound through the speaker is selected by the register controls 
("BASS-TENOR-CONTRALTO-SOPRANO"). Thus the register controls 
shift the pitch range of the Solovox keyboard to four different positions. If two 
or more of these controls are depressed simultaneously, a composite tone will be 
heard, consisting of the outputs of several dividers simultaneously sounding in 
their octave relations. 

The Mute 

The electrical waves produced by the oscillator and frequency dividers are 
of rectangular shape, consisting of odd harmonics and representing the clarinet 
or woodwind family of tone qualities. This type of tone is heard with the mute 
control "on". 

To produce the string quality tones heard with the mute control "off", even 
harmonics must be added. These are obtained by adding rectangular waves from 
higher frequency dividers, in reduced amplitude. This effect is possible because 
the fundamental frequency of the tenor range, for instance, is the same as the 
second harmonic of the bass range, the fundamental of the contralto range is the 
same as the bass fourth harmonic, and so on. 

In the case of the soprano range, since no higher octaves are available, the 
string tone is obtained directly from an "oscillator rectifier" tube which produces 
a combination of odd and even harmonics from the oscillator output. 

Note; Models J and K Solovox have different mute circuits. (.See Page 3).' 

Page-6 ■ ■ " ■ ■ . • • 



"Deep Tone," "Full Tone," "First Voice," "Second Voice," and "Brilliant" 
Controls. 

Just ahead of the preamplifier is a series of tone controlling circuits arranged 
to alter the frequency characteristic of the amplifier in a manner similar to radio 
tone controls. For instance, with "DEEP TONE" the signal develops across a 
condenser which emphasizes the low frequencies; with "FULL TONE" the 
signal develops across a resistor with a small condenser in shunt, which leaves 
the frequency characteristic essentially flat except for the very high frequencies ; 
"FIRST VOICE" puts a resonance in the 400 cycle zone; "SECOND VOICE" 
puts a resonance near 800 cycles ; and with "BRILLIANT" the signal develops 
across an inductance, emphasizing the higher frequencies. These tone control 
circuits are connected in series, and may be used singly or in groups. At least one 
of the five tone controls and at least one of the register controls must be in "on" 
position before any signal can be heard from the loud speaker. 

Control Tubes V9 and VIQ 

As mentioned before, the control contacts under the playing keys serve to 
remove the cutoff bias from control tubes V9 and V10. This is explained by con- 
sidering that the cathodes of tubes V9 and VI are connected to the midpoint of 
the voltage divider shown below the control tubes in Figure 1 A. When no playing 
key is pressed, this voltage is about 150 volts positive with respect to ground, and, 
therefore, these tubes are cut off. When any playing key control contact is closed,' 
a resistance totaling 2700 ohms is put in parallel with the lower kg of the voltage 
divider and this causes the cathode voltage to drop to about 50 volts. This removes 
the cutoff bias from control tubes V9 and VI wKirh ? ™» «f th~ «>„,„«.„ mt n f( 
type. The 6 mfd. condenser serves to make the tonal attack and decay rate smooth. 
A condenser connected between the keying circuit and the center tap of trans- 
former T2 produces a slow rate of attack but can be disconnected if desired by 
operating the "fast attack" switch. 



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The volume of the Soiovox is controlled by a knee-operated rheostat. This 
rheostat is actually a switch connected to seven fixed resistors and is, therefore, 

a ~j— >■" "^< is io me usuiii L>pe or vojume control, inis rneostat forms 

part of a voltage divider circuit which varies. the grid bias to the remote cutoff 
control tubes V9 and V10 and, therefore, changes the gain of these tubes to pro- 



Page 7 



duce a corresponding change of volume from the speaker. The grid potential var- 
ies from approximately 25 volts at the maximum volume position (depending on 
setting of maximum volume control), to approximately ground potential at the 
minimum position ( depending on setting of minimum volume control) . 

The Vibrato 

The vibrato effect is produced by means of a 6-cycles-per-second vacuum 
tube phase shift oscillator which drives a vacuum tube switching circuit. As 
the switching tube is turned on and off by the vibrato oscillator, it shunts a small 
condenser intermittently across the master oscillator tuning circuit and causes 
the master oscillator frequency to vary, producing a vibrato effect. 

Tuning 

The Solovox, as a whole, is tuned by adjusting the capacity of the tuning 
condenser and thereby changing the frequency of the master oscillator. 

Two tuning knobs accomplish this by shunting additional capacities across 
the main tuning condenser. 

Power Output Stage 

VI 1 and V12 are power output pentodes connected in the usual push-pull 
manner to drive the permanent magnet type loud speaker. 

Power Supply 

The power supply of the Solovox uses a single rectifier tube, V13. Note 
that control tubes V9 and VI have a separate heater winding on power trans- 
former Tl. This prevents an appreciable difference in potential from arising 
between the heaters and cathodes of control tubes V9 and V10. 

TUNING AND SIMPLE ADJUSTMENTS WHICH 

ANY OWNER CAN MAKE 

Tuning , . 

The Solovox ordinarily remains in tune indefinitely. However, because of 
the- variation in pitch of -the piano or other instruments with which the Solovox is 
to be played, two tuning adjustment knobs have been' provided. These are located 

■ Page 8 



under the keyboard to the left of the volume control. Tuning the Solovox is a very 
simple matter, as all of the tones are simultaneously tuned by making this single 
adjustment. 

To tune the Solovox, first adjust the knob farthest to the left (rough tuning ad- 
justment) for approximate tuning, with the other knob (fine tuning adjustment) 
in its center position. Then adjust the fine tuning knob until the tuning is accu- 
rate. For greatest accuracy, only the "CONTRALTO", "VIBRATO OFF", 
and "DEEP TONE" control tablets should be "in" and the middle octave F# key 
of the Solovox tuned to the corresponding piano note. (A control tablet is "in" 
when the top of the tablet is pushed in.) 

Adjustment of Maximum and Minimum Volume Controls 

The maximum volume control knob is located under the keyboard to the right 
of the volume control. It regulates the maximum loudness when the knee-operated 
lever is all the way to the right. 

The minimum volume control is located a little to the left of the maximum 
volume control and is provided with a screwdriver slot for adjusting. It is used to 
regulate the minimum loudness when the knee-operated lever is all the way to the 
left. 

When readjusting both controls, always set the minimum volume control first, 
as it has some effect on the maximum volume as well. To do this, set the tablets to 
some useful setting such as "CONTRALTO" and "DEEP TONE". With the 
knee-operated volume control released, so that it points directly out, hold down a 
key and turn the slotted minimum volume control until the note is as soft as is 
useful. (When once set this control will probably not need to be changed. If you 
ever move it, be sure to check the maximum volume afterwards.) 

To adjust the maximum volume control knob, move the knee-operated volume 
control as far as it will go to the right, holding down a key, and turn the knob to 
the right until the volume becomes as loud as is useful. Do not turn the knob to 
the right any further as to do so will only mean that the knee-operated volume 
control will become unnecessarily sensitive, which is particularly undesirable 
for the novice and beginner. 

PRACTICAL SERVICE, SUGGESTIONS 
The materials and electrical parts in the Hammond Solovox are of the finest 

Page 9 



oualitv available. Aside from occasional replacement of a vacuum tube, no servtce 
Itemln ed be expected to arise. A few conditions which mtght possibly be 
e P „coumered are listed below with information which will enable a radto servtce 
technician to correct them without difficulty. 

1 Cable Connector. In case the Solovox fails to play correctly, first make sure 
that he die connector in the left end of the keyboard under the £££££ 
The face of the plug and its receptacle should be together. If the Solovox does 
not olav properly, this is the most likely cause. 

? ReMacin, tubes. There are thirteen tubes in the Solovox, as shown on 

the Ustp' These are all standard radio tubes, and can be tested and re- 

1 7 if necessary by any radio dealer. All tubes can be reached from the 

E of Z ^ tone cabme^e sure to replace all tubes in the exact sockets 

from which they came. 

The two type 6SK7 control tubes (V9 and V10) should be stm.lar ^ to avoid 
undesirable thumps when playing. It is therefore recommended that both be 
replaced at the same time with new tubes of the same make 

S Instrument Fails to Play. Ordinarily in this case all the tubes should be 
tested If he ub s are lig hted, the cable plug is making proper connection, and 
The conlrok are in playing position, the most likely --0^ ^ 

voltage measurements given on the circuit Diagram w 
technician to locate the trouble. 

A dirty key contact may cause an irregular sputte ring or crack hng of a 
singfe note In this case, move the bus-bar shifters as described m the fo„o„ ,ng 

suggestions numbered "6" and "7". 

■ ^ * 1 n»„e *,nt Plnv If all keys fail to play on one regis- 
4 One Register Control Does not flay, ir an^cys f 

„,™1 with the mute "on," but play correctly with all other co ^ ~ 

ter control with the mute on, y y removing 

register control tablet may have a dirty ^ntac. . ; may ^ nfro i s ) 

; , , • (.u ^ntml nsnel (which includes the tour register cuuuuis; 
t Up. ipft certion or toe control panci vwuivn 

LUC: ivli avvi.vti .w*. 

and wiping the contacts carefully. _ 

A broken cable wire or poor plug connectionin the — cncmt o^nglc 

frequency divider may cause the *"- J^Xntrol is coimected 
connected to the ^-d trequency niv.de,^ ^ A, ^^ ^ 

to the second frequency divider; the CONIKALIO con 



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the first frequency divider; and the "SOPRANO" control is connected to the 
oscillator. 

In case the frequency divider itself is not operating, all dividers below it will 
also fail to play. A cathode-ray oscilloscope connected from ground to the plate 
of any divider tube should show a rectangular wave, while the plate of any 
divider driver tube should show a very sharp and narrow negative pulse. 

5. One Tone Control Will Not Turn Off. If one of the tone controls does 
not turn off when pressed in at the bottom, the tone control tablet probably has a 
dirty contact. It may be cleared by removing the right section of the control 
panel and wiping the contacts carefully. 

6. One Key Does Not Sound. If a certain key fails to play on any of the reg- 
ister controls, it probably has a dirty control contact which can be cleared easily 
by shifting the control contact bus-bar, whose adjustment is at the right end of 
the keyboard under the molded bakelite end piece. Figure 3A shows how the 
bus-bar shifters are arranged. Loosen the clamping screw, shift the bus-bar about 
1/32", and tighten the clamping screw carefully. 

7. One Key Plays Lowest "C" Note Instead of its Correct Pitch (with adja- 
cent keys playing- correctly). In this case the key has a dirty tuning contact 
which can be cleared easily by shifting the tuning contact bus-bar, whose adjust- 
ment is at the left end of the keyboard. Adjust as described in the preceding 
paragraph. 

8. Key Thumps or Clicks. If a transient effect in the form of an annoying 
thump appears each time a key is released, the two type 6SK7 control tubes V9 
and V10 are probably not matched properly. In this case install two new tubes 
of the same make. A loud click each time a key is released indicates that the 
control tube cathode condenser (6 mfd. 200 V.) is probably open or partially 
open. 

9. Hum. An excessive 120 cycle hum in the speaker indicates that one of the 
filter condensers is open or low in capacity. 

10. Tuning of Individual Notes. The individual note tuning system em- 
ployed in the Model L holm ox consists of 36 small inductance coils, each of 
which is adjustable by moving the coil on its iron core. This tuning system is 
much more stable than the piano because it has practically no aging effect and' 
is very insensitive to ordinary humidity and temperature changes. However, 
after long use under extremely adverse humidity conditions it is possible that 

. . _ Page 11 



some notes of the instrument may not be exactly in tune with each other. Before 
concluding that this is the case, carefully tune the middle F# note as described 
on page 8. Remember that under these extreme conditions of humidity pianos 
frequently get out of tune very rapidly (in a matter of hours). If you are sure 
that the tuning discrepancy does lie in the Solovox notes and not in the piano, 
the individual notes may be retuned as follows : 

(a) Connect the speaker output of the Solovox to one set of plates of an oscil- 
loscope, and connect the speaker output of a Hammond Organ to the 
other set of oscilloscope plates. In case a Hammond Organ is not avail- 
able, you can use a new Solovox accurately tuned to A-440 pitch. When 
tuning with the organ, use the first white drawbar (fundamental) only 
and the highest three octaves of organ keys. 

(b) Remove the bakelite front and back covers of the tuner box at the rear 
of the Solovox keyboard, exposing the numbered tuning coils. The key- 
board wiring diagram, Figure 3A shows the location of these coils. 

(c) In order to stop the vibrato completely, connect cable terminal No. 3 to 
ground. Set the rough tuning and fine tuning controls to their center 
positions. With "CONTRALTO," "VIBRATO OFF," and "DEEP 
TONE" tablets pressed in at the top, hold down the highest B keys on 
the Solovox and organ. Loosen the clamping screw on coil 36 and slide 
the coil carefully up or down until the Solovox note is tuned to the cor- 
responding organ note as indicated by the oscilloscope wave pattern 
either standing still or moving very slowly (one cycle in two or more sec- 
onds). Tighten the clamping screw. 

(d) Release the B keys and hold down the highest A# keys on the Solovox 
and organ. Now adjust coil 35 in the same way. Then release the A# 
keys and hold down the A keys and tune coil 34. Repeat for all the 
other keys and coils in chromatic order downward. It is important that 
you start tuning with the highest note and progress down one key at a 
time because the tuning of the lower keys is dependent upon all of the 
higher coils. 

Note: From the above you can see that tuning the individual notes requires con- 
siderable skill as well as a Hammond Organ and oscilloscope. "It is not 

recommended that the owner try to do this himself. 

Page 12 



SOLOVOX TUBE SOCKET VOLTAGES 

These readings are taken with a 1000 ohms-per-volt meter, having three scales of 50, 250, and 1000 volts. All 
voltages are taken with a line voltage of 117, and deviations of as much as 20% may be caused by line voltage varia- 
tions. All controls are off, the volume control is in its softest position, and no key is depressed unless specified. The 
negative lead of the voltmeter is connected to chassis ground except as noted.. 



Connect Positive Meter Should Read 

Voltmeter Lead to: (Volts) This Shows Voltage of 

"+300" 310 1st filter condenser 

"+290" 290 2nd filter condenser 

"+280" 280 3rd filter condense^ 

Ground (neg. to " — 2.5") 2.5 to 3.0 Vibrato oscillator bias 

Tube VI (term. #2) 165 Master oscillator plate 

Tube VI (term. #3) 9 Master oscillator cathode 

Tube VI (term. #5) 10 Vibrato switch tube plate 

(Use 250 V. scale) 

Tube V2 (term. #2) 185 Vibrato oscillator plate 

( Meter should oscil- 
late slightly) 

Tube V2 (term. #5) 210 Master Oscillator plate 

Tube V2 (term. #6) 4 Master Oscillator cathode 

Tube V3 (term. #2) 80 Oscillator rectifier plate 

Tube V3 (term. #3) . 5 Oscillator rectifier cathode 

Tubes V3 (term. #5), V5 

(term. #2 & 5) 260 Driver Plates 

(Use 1000 V. scale) 

Tube V4, V6, V7, term. #2 & #5) 190 Divider Plates 

(Use 1000 V. scale) 

Tube V7 (term. #6) 40 Driver & Divider Cathodes 

Tube V8 (term. #3) 65 Preamplifier plate 

Tube V8 (term. #8) 1 Preamplifier cathode 

Tubes V9 and V10 (term. #8). . 280 Control tube plates 

Tube V9 (term. #6) 130 Control tube screens 

Tube V9 (term. #5) 145 Control tube cathodes 

(no key depressed) (tubes cut off) 

Tube V9 (term. #5) 45 Control tube cathodes 

(any key depressed) (tubes operating) 

Tubes VI 1 and V12 (term. #3). 300 Output tube plates 

Tube VI 1 (term. #4) 290 Output tube screens 

Tube VI 1 (term. #8) 25 Output tube cathodes 

Cable terminal #12 ,. 0-20 Control tube grids 

(Volume control in softest position) (exact voka f de P ends f ^tting of 

^ minimum volume control.) 

Cable Terminal #12. . -. . 5-30 . Control tube grids . 

' (Volume control in loudest position ) fexact volta ^ depends on setting of 

1 ' maximum and minimum volume con- 

-.--.. ■ . trols.) ..... 

Page 13 



AC VOLTAGES 

Heater Voltage to all tubes except V13 6.3 V. RMS 

Rectifier tube V13 filament voltage ■ 5 V. RMS 

Ground to either plate of rectifier tube 300 V. RMS 

AC ripple voltage across two 1200 ohm power supply 

resistors 3 V. RMb 

AC ripple voltage across 1000 ohm power supply resistor 15 V. RMS 

REPAIR PARTS 

A great many of the electrical parts are standard radio parts, obtainable at 
any radio store. Such parts include tubes, resistors, and condensers, both paper 
and electrolytic. The correct values are given in the diagrams. 

The transformers and coils are mostly special. To obtain such parts from 
us specify the model and serial number of your Solovox tone cabinet and the 
designation used in Figures 1, 2, or 3. For example: Transformer Tl for Solo- 
vox Model L, serial number 80000. 

We suggest that if your Solovox should ever need repair you call your 
nearest Hammond dealer, or ask us where nearest dealer is located. If your 
Hammond dealer is not conveniently available, this booklet, with the accom- 
panying diagrams, will enable a competent radio service man to locate the 

trouble. 

PATENTS AND TRADEMARKS 

"Solovox" is the Trade Mark of the Hammond Instrument Company and is registered in the United States 
Patent Office. 

The Solovox is protected by patents and patents pending in the United States and principal foreign coun- 
tries, including the following United States Patents. 

Des. 123,686 1,956,350 2,142,580 2,253,782 

Des. 124,405 2,099,204 2,203,569 2,254,284 

Re. 20,831 2,117,002 2,233,258 2,254,366 

GUARANTEE 

The Hammond Solovox is guaranteed by Hammond Instrument Company for the period of one year after date 
of delivery. Our liability under this guarantee is limited to replacing or repairing at our factory, or at any service 
station or dealer we may designate, any parts proving defective in workmanship or materia! during such period. 

Hammond Instrument Company does not guarantee the vacuum tubes or speaker cone employed in this 
instrument. Such parts are standard and are covered by the guarantee of their makers. 

The guarantee of Hammond Instrument Company does not extend to any damage caused to the Solovox or 
any of its parts because of abuse, accident, or improper operation. 



Page 14 



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REPAIR PARTS 

A great many of the electrical parts are standard radio parts, obtainable at 
any radio store. Such parts include tubes, resistors, and condensers, both paper 
and electrolytic. The correct values are given in the diagrams. 

The transformers and coils are mostly special. To obtain such parts from 
us specify the model and serial number of your Solovox tone cabinet and the 
designation used in Figures 1A, 2 A, or 3 A. For example : Transformer Tl for 
Solovox Model L, serial number 92000. 

We suggest that if your Solovox should ever need repair you call your 
nearest Hammond dealer, or ask us where nearest dealer is located If your 
Hammond dealer is not conveniently available, this booklet, with the accom- 
panying diagrams, will enable a competent radio service man to locate the 

PATENTS AND TRADEMARKS 

"Solovox" is the Trade Mark of the Hammond Instrument Company and is registered in the United States 

^^Th^oLox is protected by patents and patents pending in the United States and principal foreign coun- 
tries including the following United States Patents. 

r> 197 am 1956 350 2,142,580 2,253,782 

Des. 123,686 i'2J" 2 203 569 2,254,284 

Dm 124 405 2,099,204 z,^uj,jo^ > ' 

f I.; > - 2 233 258 2,254,366 

Re. 20,831 2,117,002 z,zjj,^o 

GUARANTEE 

The Hammond Solovox is guaranteed by Hammond Instrument Company for the period of one year after date 
of delerv Our Habky under this guarantee is limited to replacing or repairing at our factory, or at any serv.ce 
Hon o dealer w mav designate, any parts proving defective in workmanship or matenal dunng such penod 

Hammond l Instrument Company does not guarantee the vacuum tubes or speaker cone employed m th» 
.Wrument Such parts are standard and are covered by the guarantee of their makers. 

Tg^H^ Instrument Company does not extend to any damage caused to the Solovox or 
any of its parts because of abuse, accident, or improper operation. 



Page 13 




Page 14 




Page 15 



GENERATOR CHASSIS 



CABLE PLUG 

CONNECTS TO 

KEYBOARD 




FILTER CONOENSER 



TO REMOVE CHASSIS 
AND COVER PANEL 
FROM CABINET REMOVE 
TWO MACHINE SCREWS, 
SIX WOOD SCREWS 
AND TWO SELF-TAPPING 
SCREWS. 



COVER PANEL 



REAR VIEW OF TONE CABINET 

SOLOVOX MODEL L 

■ FIGURE 5A 

Page 16 



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